Category Archives: immunotherapy

Dare We Say the “C” Word at the Same Time as Lung Cancer?

When I was diagnosed with lung cancer, the chances that a late-stage lung cancer patient would live five years was merely 4%. In fact, the American Lung Association, even today, gives the following survival rates:

“The five-year survival rate for lung cancer is 55 percent for cases detected when the disease is still localized (within the lungs). However, only 16 percent of lung cancer cases are diagnosed at an early stage. For distant tumors (spread to other organs) the five-year survival rate is only 4 percent.”1

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It’s about the Journey

I remember the days following my diagnosis as if they were yesterday. I was told I might not have very many more days here on earth, so I decided I better enjoy and make the most of the days I had. And, even though my initial prognosis was only four months, I somehow decided from the very beginning that I was going to try to bring hope to others with this disease.

Don’t let the diagnosis steal your joy

When my mom, husband and I showed up for my first chemo treatment, I wore a t-shirt that said, “It’s about the journey” and that’s the attitude I have tried to adopt. I asked my husband to video my first chemo treatment. I wanted to post it online to document the fact that a dire cancer diagnosis doesn’t have to be scary, doesn’t have to steal your joy.

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Dealing with the Nausea and Vomiting Associated with Chemotherapy

When I think about my chemotherapy experience, I think of three things: vomiting my guts up, severe constipation and extreme fatigue. My chemo treatments were on a 3-week rotation. I suffered mightily during the first week, felt better the second week, and felt pretty darn good by the third week. The vomiting only lasted a few days, constipation lasted a bit longer.

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Everyone Needs Support Sometimes

When I was diagnosed with lung cancer, I didn’t know anyone else who was still alive and fighting the disease. I started searching around and ultimately landed on a group where I feel totally at home – it is called WhatNext.

I am going to post two links below that will help you know if you think WhatNext will be a good fit for you. I go to a lot of different lung-cancer related forums, but I spend most of my time on WhatNext. It feels like home to me.

On WhatNext, there are caregivers and loved ones, survivors, and people from the medical field for all kinds of cancer from skin cancer to liver, lung, or lymphoma cancers. Take a look at the information below and please join, if it sounds like a place you’d like to be a part of!

This link tells you a lot of the benefits of the group in an advertising way:  https://www.whatnext.com/ilp/lungcancer/?campaign=AMLC

SandiA is a Stage 4 Melanoma survivor who is active on the site. She tells you why she loves WhatNext so much!

Let me know if you joined the group because you saw this post! I look forward to seeing you! I think you’ll love it there as much as I do!

https://www.whatnext.com/ilp/lungcancer/?campaign=AMLC

The Hope that is Research

I have to begin this blog on a sad note. There have been personal and national tragedies that occurred since I agreed to write a blog about hope and optimism. I lost three friends to cancer in a week’s time … and last night, my city lost five police officers who were gunned down in cold blood while doing their job of overseeing a peaceful protest march. Sometimes, events make it hard to see joy and optimism, but it’s still there. We just have to look a little harder.

donna-roseEven though I will miss my friends badly, they each outlived their prognosis for stage IV lung cancer by years. The reason they beat the statistics and had years added to their lives after being diagnosed is because of the huge advances being made every single day in new treatment options.

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originally published July 14, 2016

One More Fun, Fun Opportunity Came My Way

Imagine my surprise when I got a call on Friday from the American Lung Association asking if I would be available to interview with NBC Nightly News about my journey with lung cancer and immunotherapy. Oh my goodness!!! They apologized because it was short notice … and I was thinking, “Who cares??? Thank you, thank you, thank you for the opportunity!!!”

I spoke with the person who was going to be putting the story together on Friday. There was a caveat. The spot might or might not make it. And, we wouldn’t know until Sunday night or Monday morning. And, the interview needed to take place on Monday morning!

Lucky for me, the appointment for my first-ever monthly immunotherapy infusion was set for 3 PM on Monday, the latest it has ever been scheduled. That gave me enough time to do the interview and still make it to my appointment.

I’m not a housekeeper. I wish I was, but I’m just not. I get really tired when I think about pushing around the vacuum cleaner or finding spots for all of the stuff we seem to collect. (Keep in mind, that fatigue lifts immediately if someone offers the opportunity to do something I think is fun…) So, when the call came early Monday morning that the show would go on, I had to scurry, scurry to get at least one room of the house clean enough to be on NBC Nightly News!!

While I was getting ready for the interview, I received an email from another person at NBC News. She wanted to know if I could do a phone interview with her for a piece she was writing for their Web site. Wow! Well, yes!!! I will definitely find the time for that!! It is an advocate’s dream to reach as large an audience as possible with our stories!

setting up the cameras for filming

I had barely hung up the phone when the person arrived to tape my interview for the news. My part was taped at my house, but I was interviewed by people in Washington, DC. That was interesting to do because I couldn’t see their faces so I wasn’t sure if I was answering the questions like they expected or if I had said enough or too much … I was honestly surprised at the clips they chose to use in the story because those were some where I thought I might not be responding as they would have expected.

It takes a long time to get a minute’s worth of video for something!! The guy who did the filming … I’m not sure what his title would be … arrived at 10 AM. He was still uploading footage to NBC at 1:30 PM. I had to tell him we had to leave because we hadn’t had anything to eat yet and I had to be at UTSW for an infusion by 3. It takes an hour to get there, so we were pushed for time!

I so wanted to be home in time to see the NBC Nightly News, but it was not to be. Things moved like molasses at the infusion center. It took longer for my bloodwork to be processed and then it took awhile for my Opdivo to get ready. I was still sitting in the infusion chair when the 5:30 Nightly News came on.

I’ve never done it before and might not have done it if I wasn’t the last person in the infusion center, but I asked if they would change the channel to the news so I could watch. I don’t think they believed me when I said I was going to be on it.

It started out showing me with my dogs. How appropriate!!! My dogs are a big, big part of my life. I thought it was awesome that they included them in the news piece!

One other thing before I have to run and get ready for a fun day photographing bluebonnets with a friend who in Texas from Florida – it has been so much fun hearing from people from all across the US who saw the news report and wrote to me. I have sure enjoyed getting in touch!!

So, without further adieu, here is the news article that Maggie Fox wrote. Embedded in it is a link to the news story.

https://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-news/immunotherapy-transforms-lung-cancer-biggest-cancer-killer-n866356