Category Archives: immunotherapy

Dealing with the Nausea and Vomiting Associated with Chemotherapy

When I think about my chemotherapy experience, I think of three things: vomiting my guts up, severe constipation and extreme fatigue. My chemo treatments were on a 3-week rotation. I suffered mightily during the first week, felt better the second week, and felt pretty darn good by the third week. The vomiting only lasted a few days, constipation lasted a bit longer.

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Everyone Needs Support Sometimes

When I was diagnosed with lung cancer, I didn’t know anyone else who was still alive and fighting the disease. I started searching around and ultimately landed on a group where I feel totally at home – it is called WhatNext.

I am going to post two links below that will help you know if you think WhatNext will be a good fit for you. I go to a lot of different lung-cancer related forums, but I spend most of my time on WhatNext. It feels like home to me.

On WhatNext, there are caregivers and loved ones, survivors, and people from the medical field for all kinds of cancer from skin cancer to liver, lung, or lymphoma cancers. Take a look at the information below and please join, if it sounds like a place you’d like to be a part of!

This link tells you a lot of the benefits of the group in an advertising way:  https://www.whatnext.com/ilp/lungcancer/?campaign=AMLC

SandiA is a Stage 4 Melanoma survivor who is active on the site. She tells you why she loves WhatNext so much!

Let me know if you joined the group because you saw this post! I look forward to seeing you! I think you’ll love it there as much as I do!

https://www.whatnext.com/ilp/lungcancer/?campaign=AMLC

The Hope that is Research

I have to begin this blog on a sad note. There have been personal and national tragedies that occurred since I agreed to write a blog about hope and optimism. I lost three friends to cancer in a week’s time … and last night, my city lost five police officers who were gunned down in cold blood while doing their job of overseeing a peaceful protest march. Sometimes, events make it hard to see joy and optimism, but it’s still there. We just have to look a little harder.

donna-roseEven though I will miss my friends badly, they each outlived their prognosis for stage IV lung cancer by years. The reason they beat the statistics and had years added to their lives after being diagnosed is because of the huge advances being made every single day in new treatment options.

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originally published July 14, 2016

One More Fun, Fun Opportunity Came My Way

Imagine my surprise when I got a call on Friday from the American Lung Association asking if I would be available to interview with NBC Nightly News about my journey with lung cancer and immunotherapy. Oh my goodness!!! They apologized because it was short notice … and I was thinking, “Who cares??? Thank you, thank you, thank you for the opportunity!!!”

I spoke with the person who was going to be putting the story together on Friday. There was a caveat. The spot might or might not make it. And, we wouldn’t know until Sunday night or Monday morning. And, the interview needed to take place on Monday morning!

Lucky for me, the appointment for my first-ever monthly immunotherapy infusion was set for 3 PM on Monday, the latest it has ever been scheduled. That gave me enough time to do the interview and still make it to my appointment.

I’m not a housekeeper. I wish I was, but I’m just not. I get really tired when I think about pushing around the vacuum cleaner or finding spots for all of the stuff we seem to collect. (Keep in mind, that fatigue lifts immediately if someone offers the opportunity to do something I think is fun…) So, when the call came early Monday morning that the show would go on, I had to scurry, scurry to get at least one room of the house clean enough to be on NBC Nightly News!!

While I was getting ready for the interview, I received an email from another person at NBC News. She wanted to know if I could do a phone interview with her for a piece she was writing for their Web site. Wow! Well, yes!!! I will definitely find the time for that!! It is an advocate’s dream to reach as large an audience as possible with our stories!

setting up the cameras for filming

I had barely hung up the phone when the person arrived to tape my interview for the news. My part was taped at my house, but I was interviewed by people in Washington, DC. That was interesting to do because I couldn’t see their faces so I wasn’t sure if I was answering the questions like they expected or if I had said enough or too much … I was honestly surprised at the clips they chose to use in the story because those were some where I thought I might not be responding as they would have expected.

It takes a long time to get a minute’s worth of video for something!! The guy who did the filming … I’m not sure what his title would be … arrived at 10 AM. He was still uploading footage to NBC at 1:30 PM. I had to tell him we had to leave because we hadn’t had anything to eat yet and I had to be at UTSW for an infusion by 3. It takes an hour to get there, so we were pushed for time!

I so wanted to be home in time to see the NBC Nightly News, but it was not to be. Things moved like molasses at the infusion center. It took longer for my bloodwork to be processed and then it took awhile for my Opdivo to get ready. I was still sitting in the infusion chair when the 5:30 Nightly News came on.

I’ve never done it before and might not have done it if I wasn’t the last person in the infusion center, but I asked if they would change the channel to the news so I could watch. I don’t think they believed me when I said I was going to be on it.

It started out showing me with my dogs. How appropriate!!! My dogs are a big, big part of my life. I thought it was awesome that they included them in the news piece!

One other thing before I have to run and get ready for a fun day photographing bluebonnets with a friend who in Texas from Florida – it has been so much fun hearing from people from all across the US who saw the news report and wrote to me. I have sure enjoyed getting in touch!!

So, without further adieu, here is the news article that Maggie Fox wrote. Embedded in it is a link to the news story.

https://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-news/immunotherapy-transforms-lung-cancer-biggest-cancer-killer-n866356

 

 

 

 

Vent #1 – Authors Fabricating Information to Support Premises

I have a few vents, actually. One has to do with the stigma associated with lung cancer. And, I am going to address that one real soon. The stigma is killing people. Lots of people. It is frustrating, maddening, an outrage, and yes, again, deadly.

But, I have a vent for today that is fresh on my mind that I want to talk about. This one may affect people who have had lung cancer for a while and who have been quoted a bit all over the Web and in magazines, etc. Because it may have happened to you, too.

Today, I went in search of an article where I had been featured. In the search box, I typed my name and lung cancer.

That search brought up legitimate sources … and then it showed my name as being included in a book. This book was co-written by a Yale-educated MD (who also has an MBA from Wharton Business School) and a Ph.D. who has reported award-winning health and science segments for Dateline, Today Show and 48 Hours.

First of all, the authors never contacted me for permission to include my information in their book. Perhaps, since I put myself out there on the Web like I do, that is no problem. The problem is that they published completely false information to support their premise.

What was true in the book:

  1. My name
  2. My date of diagnosis
  3. A quote

What was false in the book:

  1. My diagnosis (supposedly adenocarcinoma (true) with BRAF mutation (false))
  2. My treatment (nivolumab (true) combined with chemotherapy (false) – in fact, they were not even trialing chemo plus nivolumab when I began my trial, I don’t think)
  3. The results of this treatment (tumors spread all over my body shrank (false); my tumors remained stable for 4.5 years while I was in the trial testing nivolumab. They did not shrink, they did not grow. They stayed stable. Furthermore, I don’t have tumors all over my body. I had tumors in both lungs and in lymph nodes in my neck. I don’t consider that all over my body and I doubt you do either.)

I am outraged. Absolutely furious. These people who wrote this book apparently have a lot of clout. And, yet, in at least this instance, they are using false information to support their premises.

Now, I don’t know about you, but I don’t deal lightly with liars. Furthermore, when a person is caught in a very obvious, blatant lie, I tend to question every other word out of their mouths (or off of their pen on paper). Without fact-checking every single word in one of the many books published by this duo or in anything they would say in conferences, I would have to believe none of it.

And, here’s the saddest part of all. I have surpassed five years of survival with Stage IV lung cancer. I have lived the majority of that time to the absolute fullest. I have done very well on nivolumab. I have had over 100 infusions of the drug – how many others can say that I wonder?

Maybe I am biased since it is me we are talking about, but I think I have a pretty remarkable story without fabricating new facts. I would not mind being featured in a book without first being contacted IF … IF … IF … the book told the truth.

What’s next?

I see my oncologist on Monday. I already sent him a copy of what was written. I will be very interested to hear his take on it all. My first inclination is to find an attorney who might be willing to sue this duo on contingency. My goal isn’t money. My goal is to shed light on the fact that false information is being published to support premises. That’s dangerous.