Are We Wasting Time Appealing to Congress?

I write to Congress fairly often in hopes of convincing them to throw more support toward lung cancer research. But, I wonder if my time wouldn’t be better spent writing to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and/or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)?

Here’s why I ask. I received a response to one of my letters from my senator, John Cornyn, that actually included some potentially valuable information. He wrote,

As you know, entities such as the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are charged with allocating federal research dollars toward research and initiatives that will advance prevention and successfully treat diseases and health conditions. I believe Congress plays an important role in overseeing the distribution of these monies and must ensure they are wisely spent.¹(emphasis mine)

Should we not then be concentrating some of our efforts to advocating the CDC and the NIH to allocate more of the research dollars they receive to lung cancer? I mean, I know we need to talk to Congress about budgeting the dollars for NIH or CDC, but once there, I am not sure their researchers feel a real need to fund lung cancer.

I base my theory, in part, on a statement made by the NIH to Cure Magazine in August 2017. I was angry and incredulous when I read:

According to the National Institutes of Health, lung cancer received about $250 million in recent years in research funding annually, and it claimed 25 percent of all cancer deaths. That means that about $1,700 is spent for every person who dies each year from lung cancer. That spending rate is much higher for other forms of cancer.

Leukemia receives about $240 million a year and accounts for about 4 percent of cancer deaths. That means almost $10,000 is spent for every person who dies of leukemia. For breast cancer, that number is about $13,000.

The NIH states that funding is provided to research based on its scientific merits, not the type of cancer it targets. (emphasis mine)²

Lung cancer kills more people than the next three biggest cancer killers combined: prostate, breast, and colon. The NIH surely sees breast cancer as a worthy cause to fund. Are the researchers seeking funds that target breast cancer that much better grant writers or trial designers than those seeking money for lung cancer research? I sincerely doubt it.


If you wish to make your voice heard by the NIH, contact information for the Director  is:

Francis S. Collins, MD, PhD
BG 1 RM 118A
1 Center Dr
Bethesda, MD 20814
francis.collins@nih.gov
301-496-2433

You can contact the CDC at:

Anne Schuchat, MD, Acting Director
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
1600 Clifton Road
Atlanta, GA 30329-4027

The National Cancer Institute’s contact information is:

  1. 1-800-4-CANCER (telephone answered weekdays from 9 AM until 9 PM ET)
  2. LiveHelp Online Chat, LiveHelp (M-F, 9AM – 9PM ET)
  3. Email

Mr. Cornyn further advised me that he does not sit on the Senate Appropriations Committee so has little jurisdiction over how the annual appropriations bill will be allocated.

So, I guess my next question is to you. Does your senator sit on the Appropriations Committee? Please click on the link and send your Senator a letter if he or she is on the committee.

 

 


¹Letter from John Cornyn to Donna Fernandez (donna@hopeandsurvive.com), dated 02/09/2018

²T Keenan. “The American Lung Association Seeks to End Stigma.”  Cure Magazine. August 11, 2017. https://www.curetoday.com/articles/the-american-lung-association-seeks-to-end-stigma. Accessed 3/4/2018

 

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