A Man Called Ove and Other Audio Books

I am a latecomer to many things technology. I was once on the cutting edge, but that was now many years ago, I hate to admit. I can usually click my way around to figure out enough to be dangerous, but I am definitely slow when it comes to technology these days.

I was once active on Facebook. In recent months, I have decided a complete hiatus from it is healthiest for me. I signed up years ago for Instagram. I think I used it once. I signed up for Twitter so that I could participate in regular Twitter chats about lung cancer. Unfortunately, I find them difficult to follow and because I don’t know Twitter, difficult to understand.

Snapchat, nope. Pinterest and Google+ … well, yeah, but I don’t actually do anything much with them. (I do save some dog treat recipes to my Pinterest account.) There are other apps that I had never even heard of until recently that obviously haven’t made it to my list of favorites!

What’s all this have to do with anything, you may be asking…

Well, I am also new to audiobooks.

Chemo treatments gave me chemo brain. Chemo brain is a phenomenon that is real and that is different than anything anyone else experiences. Most of us who have it … and way too many of those of us who have had chemo do … hear friends and acquaintances try to commiserate by saying, “Oh! I have chemo brain, too! But, I never have had chemo.” Well, maybe, but doubtful.

One of the gifts of chemo brain has been the robbery of my ability to read. I used to love to read. I was a voracious reader from the time I was a young girl. I well remember my mom dropping me off at the Midland library, where I would wander the aisles for hours. She would come pick me back up and I would have checked out a big stack of books, all of which I would read before time to return them.

After the advent of chemo, concentrating long enough to read a page, much less a book, became difficult. Remembering what I had read was just not happening.

So, I quit reading. In the last year, I have managed to read a few books, but they have to start off very engaging. And, many may start off engaging, but I just can’t read them. So, again, I usually just don’t try to read much.

In the last few weeks, I have discovered a new way of “reading.” Audiobooks. I have now listened to two. One, by Greta Van Susteren, Everything You Need to Know About Social Media (Without Having to Call a Kid), taught me all about the social media apps I need to learn more about. It was a book I enjoyed a lot. I want to see the hard copy now.

Today, I listened to A Man Called Ove. It is a nine-hour recording. I listened straight through. I admit that I may have slept through a couple of parts. Not because it was boring, but just because I laid my head down … and when I did, I fell asleep!

No, the book wasn’t boring at all. It was so entertaining. I never thought that a “book on tape” could hold my interest, but I was wrong. My only problem with them is that once I start them, I don’t want to stop. I want to listen all the way through. And, nine hours is a long time to invest all at once! Of course, because I am a slow reader under the best of circumstances, nine hours is less time than I would have likely invested if I was actually reading the book myself, especially now, with my chemo brain.

A Man Called Ove had me laughing out loud over and over again. I was so absorbed in the book that I really never thought about cancer or disease or anything other than the book.

So, the point of this post is to encourage my friends who, like me, suffer from chemo brain to consider listening to books on tape. You can get them from your library. That’s where I have been getting mine. I am getting mine online so that I don’t even have to worry about returning them. When my time is up, the program takes them back. They’re never late!

My library offers books and more using two different apps. One is called Libby and the other is Hoopla. It is likely that your library uses these apps or similar to provide books and other resources to you.

Libby allows library card holders whose libraries participate to borrow ebooks and audiobooks. If you have a library card, see if you can find your library among those that participate. You can use Libby’s built-in e-reader or send books to your Kindle. The Libby app, which is part of OverDrive, includes an audiobook player.

Hoopla’s Web site explains its service options:

hoopla is a groundbreaking digital media service offered by your local public library that allows you to borrow movies, music, audiobooks, ebooks, comics and TV shows to enjoy on your computer, tablet, or phone – and even your TV! With no waiting, titles can be streamed immediately, or downloaded to phones or tablets for offline enjoyment later. We have hundreds of thousands of titles to choose from, with more being added daily. hoopla is like having your public library at your fingertips. Anytime. Anywhere.

Even if you can’t get out of the house, or out of bed, for that matter, a book on tape might be a really nice diversion for you. I stream mine on my cell phone and wear an inexpensive pair of earphones to listen (I did run the battery out of the first pair and had to change to the earpiece I bought to talk on the phone). No holding the book, no energy taken at all. But a nice way to forget your situation and lose yourself in a mystery or love story or comedy that makes you laugh out loud. (Try A Man Called Ove for laugh-out-loud fun.)

 

 

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