Gut Bacteria Could Affect How We Respond to Immunotherapy

Did you know that your gut bacteria might predict whether or not you will respond to immunotherapy? Three different studies have found that responders and non-responders can be predicted based on the composition of their intestinal microbiota.1

What do the studies show?

One of the studies, conducted by Laurence Zitvogel at the Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, Paris, looked specifically at immunotherapy response by those with non-small cell lung cancer and renal cell carcinoma. The study found that patients with more bacteria from the species Akkermansia muciniphila had the best response to anti-PD-1 therapy.

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Hydration and You. It is Important!

Hydration is important for good health and we need to be able to recognize and treat dehydration before it becomes severe. We, as cancer patients, are particularly vulnerable to dehydration, both from the disease and the treatments we receive. It is important for us to pay close attention to whether or not we are staying properly hydrated, even when we don’t feel like drinking water.

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Staying Occupied When Energy Levels are Low

Treatments that we undergo for our lung cancer can really zap our energy. Someone recently posted a question on a forum on which I participate asking what kinds of things people do to occupy their time when they don’t have much energy. It was a popular question and there were lots of great responses. Below are some ideas that you might find useful.

Paint or color

Several people mentioned painting or coloring. Neither activity takes an inordinate amount of energy, but they are calming and enjoyable. One person is teaching herself to paint watching YouTube videos (is there anything you can’t learn on YouTube?). I personally bought some books.

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